Monthly Archives: October 2014

Seeing the invisible

Track of the Brownian motion of a 50 nanometre diameter particle

Track of the Brownian motion of a 50 nanometre diameter particle in a fluid.

Nanoparticles are being used in a myriad of applications including sunscreen creams, sports equipment and even to study the stickiness of snot!  By definition, nanoparticles should have one dimension less than 100 nanometres, which is one thousandth of the thickness of a human hair.  Some nanoparticles are toxic to humans and so scientists are studying the interaction of nanoparticles with human cells.  However, a spherical nanoparticle is smaller than the wavelength length of visible light and so is invisible in a conventional optical microscope used by biologists.  We can view nanoparticles using a scanning electron microscope but the electron beam damages living cells so this is not a good solution.  An alternative is to adjust an optical microscope so that the nanoparticles produce caustics [see post entitled ‘Caustics’ on October 15th, 2014] many times the size of the particle.  These ‘adjustments’ involve closing an aperture to produce a pin-hole source of illumination and introducing a filter that only allows through a narrow band of light wavelengths.  An optical microscope adjusted in this way is called a ‘nanoscope’ and with the addition of a small oscillator on the microscope objective lens can be used to track nanoparticles using the technique described in last week’s post entitled ‘Holes in liquid‘.

The smallest particles that we have managed to observe using this technique were gold particles of diameter 3 nanometres , or about 1o atoms in diameter dispersed in a liquid.

 

Image of 3nm diameter gold particle in a conventional optical microscope (top right), in a nanoscope (bottom right) and composite images in the z-direction of the caustic formed in the nanoscope (left).

Image of 3nm diameter gold particle in a conventional optical microscope (top right), in a nanoscope (bottom right) and composite images in the z-direction of the caustic formed in the nanoscope (left).

Sources:

http://ihcp.jrc.ec.europa.eu/our_activities/nanotechnology/jrc-scientists-develop-a-technique-for-automated-three-dimensional-nanoparticle-tracking-using-a-conventional-microscope

‘Scientists use gold nanoparticles to study the stickiness of snot’ by Rachel Feldman in the Washington Post on October 9th, 2014.

J.-M. Gineste, P. Macko, E.A. Patterson, & M.P. Whelan, Three-dimensional automated nanoparticle tracking using Mie scattering in an optical microscope, Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 243, Pt 2 2011, pp. 172–178

Patterson, E.A., & Whelan, M.P., Optical signatures of small nanoparticles in a conventional microscope, Small, 4(10): 1703-1706, 2008.

Holes in fluids

Out-of-focus image from optical microscope of 10 micron diameter polystrene spheres in water

Out-of-focus image from optical microscope of 10 micron diameter polystyrene spheres in water

The holes that I wrote about last week and the week before (post entitled ‘Holes‘ on October 8th)were essentially air-filled holes in a solid plate.  When an in-plane load is applied to the plate it deforms and its surface around the hole becomes curved due to the concentration of stress and light passing through the curved surfaces is deviated to form the caustic.  If you didn’t follow that quick recap on last week then you might want flip back to last week’s post before pressing on!

The reverse situation is a solid in a fluid.  It is difficult to induce stress in a fluid so instead we can use a three-dimensional hole, i.e. a sphere, to generate the curve surface for light to pass through and be deviated.  This is quite an easy experiment to do in an optical microscope with some polystyrene spheres floating in distilled water with the microscope slightly out of focus you get bright caustics.  And if you take a series of photographs (the x-y plane) with the microscope objective lens at different heights (z-value) it is possible to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of the caustic by taking the intensity or greyscale values along the centre line of each image and using them all to create new image of the x-z and, or y-z plane, as shown in the picture.

Well done if you have got this far and are still with me!  I hope you can at least enjoy the pictures.  By the way the particle in the images is about the same diameter as a human hair.

Image in optical microscope of polystrene particle in water (left), series of images at different positions of microscope objective (centre) and artificial image created from greyscale data along centre-lines of image series (right).

Image in optical microscope of polystyrene particle in water (left), series of images at different positions of microscope objective (centre) and artificial image created from greyscale data along centre-lines of image series (right).

Source:

Patterson, E.A., & Whelan, M.P., Tracking nanoparticles in an optical microscope using caustics, Nanotechnology, 19(10): 105502, 2008.